• http://twitter.com/MariannSRegan Mariann S. Regan

    This is finely detailed research, and you present all the legal restrictions very clearly. So there is a 75-year waiting period for birth records, and a 25-year waiting period for death records. And then the public can access them. I never knew that. So many children of my ancestors (I’m working in the 1800s these days, counting down from the 1600s) died within the first year of life. I have never seen a cause mentioned, but then I have not gone through FamilySearch, and I don’t know SC privacy laws. Maybe I will have time to use your method for two infants who were born right before my mother, the 7th living child. I have their name on only one genealogy–my mother said they were “miscarriages.” But then, she didn’t say much.

    Thank you for all these explanations, and the adventure of finding out more about Carrie and Lewis.

    • http://claimingkin.com Liv Taylor-Harris

      Mariann, I do believe you will find FamilySearch.org to be an excellent resource for your research too. I truly believe knowing what you have access to, or not, is critical to your research process.

      My hope is that genealogy newbies will learn from my trials and errors — LOL! Thank you for joining me on this journey!

  • Robyn

    This is why I consider our ancestors such strong people. It was so common to lose young children! My grandmother remembered 2 siblings her mom had that died as little babies and I found both their death certificates. My grandmother even remembered one baby’s name. Her mom had 7 children that lived to adulthood. I think now with me having a toddler I can’t imagine that pain, and then to lose more than one–my goodness. I really don’t know how they made it sometimes, with all the obstacles.

    • http://claimingkin.com Liv Taylor-Harris

      You are so right Robyn, our ancestors were some strong people to withstand the emotional, physical, and mental abuse and treatment they endured. I consider myself a very strong person, but when I look at the life I’ve lived . . . I just wonder could I have made it? Would I have made it under the same conditions and circumstances? Some say I would have because I would not have had a choice . . . but, I just don’t know.

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