Wedding Wednesday: Taylor-Chapple, 1949

Wedding Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to display and share old wedding photos, wedding invitations, and announcements!

My feature bride and groom today are my parents – John Taylor and Carrie Chapple. If my father was still alive, my parents would have celebrated their 67th wedding anniversary this month/year.

John and Carrie Taylor's Wedding Day, 1949

Photo by Willie Crosby

On Sunday the 3rd of April 1949 at 4 PM
John Willie Taylor and Carrie Chapple
Were married!

Their private ceremony was officiated by Rev. Jessie Glover, the Pastor of Canaan Missionary Baptist Church that was located at 2500 Altoona Street at the time. The ceremony and reception occurred in the home of my mom’s sister and brother-in-law — Edward and Ella Louise (Chapple) Marshall who lived at 1708 Chew Street in the Greater Fifth Ward, Houston, Texas community.

Special guests and members of the bridal party in the group photo above were (standing l to r):  Joseph Chapple (Father of the Bride),  the Best man, John Taylor (Groom), Carrie Taylor (Bride), Sue Wesley (Maid of Honor), Faye Short (Soloist), Ethel (Abram) Chapple (Step-Mother of the Bride). Guests not shown were Juanita Boykins (pianist) and Willie Crosby (photographer).

Wedding Dress, 1949

Photo by Willie Crosby

The groom wore a double-breasted black suit, white shirt, black tie and black shoes. The bride’s wedding gown, veil and opera length bridal gloves in white were purchased from Solo Serve, a popular discount retail chain in downtown Houston, for $25.00!!

Wedding Cake, 1949

Photo by Willie Crosby

Their graduated tier wedding cake with white butter icing topped with a miniature bride and groom was made by her step-mother, Ethel (Abram) Chapple.

If I didn’t know this couple personally, I would have thought their wedding day wasn’t a happy one. Why? No one smiled! There were no smiles on the faces of the bride, the groom, members of the bridal party, or guests in any of these wedding photos! As I got older, I often teased my parents about these pictures. I even asked them, “were you two marrying under duress?! They would simply laugh and shake their heads at me in disbelief, not realizing that I was being serious with them.

Well, despite the solemn looks they had in their wedding photos 67 years ago . . .
they have been all smiles and looking good together ever since!

John and Carrie Taylor

Mystery Monday: Using Houston City Directories in search of Lewis Chappel

Using Houston city directories to reconstruct the lives of my great-grandparents in search of Lewis Chappel was an ideal resource for me to use at this stage of my research. I found the U.S. City Directories 1821-1989 database at Ancestry.com and the Houston City Directories online via the Houston Public Library’s Digital Archives to be very easy to use. And since city directories are original records (created at the time and place the family lived), I found them to be very insightful and filled with some pretty exciting discoveries too!

I learned from the 1910 Census that my great-grandparents had been married for 7 years, which would put their year of marriage around 1903. So with that target year in mind, I decided to start my search for them in the 1900 Houston City Directory. I simply worked forward one year at a time until I finally found them living and working together as servants in the home of a, Mrs. T. J. Goree, in 1907 (see below).

A quick search in the directory for a Mrs. T. J. Goree revealed she was the widow of  Mr. Tommie Goree. She resided at 1410 Capitol Ave and my great-grandparents were her live-in servants. Mrs. Goree’s telephone number, which was a party line, was listed as Sw. ph. 1635. [1]

Houston City Directory, 1907

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1907

[Abstraction]

Chappel Carrie (c),   servt   Mrs   T.   J.   Goree,   r.   same.
Chappel Lewis (c),   servt   Mrs.   T.   J.   Goree,   r.   same.


But it was the 1908 city directory that had me doing the “Harlem Shake” all over the house! Why?! Well, living at West 21st Ave, 1 block west of Nashua Street in the Houston Heights area were my great-grandparents and their son, Joseph, and someone by the name of Amanda Chappel (see below)!!

Okay, are you thinking what I’m thinking? I’m sure you must be thinking what I’m thinking! This Amanda Chappel is either Lewis’ mother or his sister. The old me would have stopped everything and started research on Amanda Chappel! But not this time! I’m staying focus on my search for Lewis. But make no mistake about it, I’ve got Amanda Chappel on my radar now and will track her in these directories at the same time!

Houston City Directory, 1908

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1908

[Abstraction]

Chappel Amanda (c), r.  W.  21st ave.  1 blk  w  of  Nashua.  Ho.  hts
Chappel Louis (c),  lab.  r.  W.  21st ave.  1   blk   w of Nashua.   Ho.   hts.  3.


My great-grandparents moved a lot in 1910. According to the 1910 Census, they were living at 1609 Saulnier Street in Houston’s historic 4th Ward (Freedman’s Town). But according to the 1910 city directory, they lived at 614 McGowen Avenue in 3rd Ward —  the center of Houston’s Blues Music Culture Center– too  (see below)!

Houston City Directory, 1910

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1910

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Amanda  (c),  r.  ss  W.  21st  ave,  1  blk  w  of  Nashua.  Ho.  hts.
Chappel  Lewis  (c),  lab.  r.  rear  614  McGowen  ave.  3.


By 1911, the Houston City Directory included house numbers, spouses’ names, peoples’ occupations, and places of employment . My great-grandparents are now living closer to downtown Houston at 1 N. E. Crawford Street. By now my great-grandmother’s first name (though misspelled) has been added. This entry also confirms what I learned about my great-grandfather from the 1910 census record — that he worked for a Gas company. I now have the name of his place of employment too (see below).

Amanda Chappel’s occupation as a Laundress has finally been published for the first time. As a laundress, she probably worked from home at 834 W. 21st Avenue in Houston Heights, a historic subdivision northeast of downtown that dates back to the late 1800s. [2]

Houston City Directory, 1911

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1911
Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1911

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Amanda  (c),  laundress,  r  834  W.  21st  av,  Ho.  hts.
Chappel  Lewis  (c)  (Corie),  wks  Houston  Gas  Co.,  r  1  N.  E.  Crawford.  (2).


It appears the only address change that occurred for my great-grandparents in 1912 was that they moved to — 3 N. E. Crawford – probably a house next door to where they were living in 1911 (see below).

Houston City Directory, 1912

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1912

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Amanda  (c),  r.  832  W  21st  ave,  Ho.  hts.
Chappel  Lewis  (c),  lab,  r.  3  N.  E.  Crawford.  3.


BINGO! I believe I have pinpointed the year (1913) my great-grandparents separated! Carrie is living at 1108 St. Charles Street, near downtown Houston. Lewis is living at 721 Hill Street, in 5th Ward which is understandable since he is now working at one of the largest railroad hump yards in the United States — Englewood — which is located in 5th Ward (see below).

Houston City Directory, 1913

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1913

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Carrie  (c),  r.  1108  St.  Charles.
Chappel  Lewis  (c),  wks  S. P. Shops,  h.  721 Hill.
Chappell  Amanda  (c),  r.  832  W.  21st  ave,  Ho.  hts.


Even though I wasn’t able to locate a 1914 Houston City Directory, online or offline, the 1915 Houston City Directory was most revealing!! What did I discover?! Lewis is nowhere to be found by this time, but my great-grandmother Carrie boards in the home of a, Henry Chappell.  He lives on the east side of  Houston Avenue just 1 block of 35th Avenue in an area of town called, Independence Heights, the first African American municipality in Texas (see below). [3]

Okay, are you thinking what I’m thinking? I’m sure you must be thinking what I’m thinking! This Henry Chappell is either Lewis’ older or younger brother, or an uncle!  Listen, I am really fighting this urge to stop what I’m doing right now and start research on Henry Chappel/Chappell. But I’m not going to do it! I’m going to stay focus on my search for Lewis. But trust and believe this — I have Henry Chappel on my radar screen as I continue my search in these directories for Lewis — LOL!

Houston City Directory, 1915

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1915

[Abstraction]

Chappell  Amanda  (c),  res  828  W  21st  av  Ho  Hts
Chappell  Carrie  (c)  lndrs  bds  Henry  Chappell
Chappell  Henry  (c)  lab  res  e  s  Houston  av  1  n  of  35th  av  Indpc  Hts


In the 1917 directory, I see my great-grandmother no longer boards with Henry Chappell. She now lives 1 block west of the Creosote Works (which is a Southern Pacific Railroad Shop) at the Englewood Yard in 5th Ward. I’m sure now more than ever that my great-grandparents separated in 1913, and Lewis left Houston sometime in 1913 or 1914 (see below).

Houston City Directory, 1917

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1917

[Abstraction]

Chappell  Amanda  (c)  res  828  W  21st  av  Ho  Hts
Chappell  Carrie  (c)  res  1  blk  w  of  Creosote  Wks
Chappell  Henry  (c)  hlpr  S.  P.  Shops  res  811  W  22d  av  Ho  Hts


According to the 1918 directory, my great-grandmother is working as a Dometic at 4900 Caroline Street. It doesn’t state that she lives at this location, just that she works there. If she doesn’t live there, then she probably still lives in the 5th Ward area where she was listed in the 1917 directory.

This directory also reveals someone new — Arie Chappel —who works as a laundress and boards with Henry Chappel at 717 W 22nd Ave, in Houston Heights. Since Arie hasn’t been mention in the directories before now, I wonder if she’s Henry’s wife? Okay, she’s on my radar now as well (see below)!

Houston City Directory, 1918

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1918

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Arie  (c)  lndrs  bds  717  W  22d  av  Ho  Hts
Chappel  Henry  (c)  lab  res  717  W  22d  av  Ho  Hts
Chappel  Amanda  (c)  res  828  W  21st  av  Ho  Hts
Chappel  Carrie  (c)  dom  4900 Caroline


I’m not sure where my great-grandmother, Carrie, is living in the city by 1919, but she’s not listed in the directory for that year. I also notice that Arie Chappell, who I discovered in the 1918 directory, is not listed in this year’s directory either (see below)!

Houston City Directory, 1919

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1919

[Abstraction]

Chappell  Amanda  (c)  r  828  W  21st  av
Chappell  Henry  (c)  appr  S. P. Shops  r  717  W  22d


Great news! This 1920 directory confirms my great-grandmother’s occupation that was reported in the 1920 census. Even though the enumerator did not record the actual address of the home she was buying at this time, this directory entry gives me some idea as to where she lived — on the west side of August Street, 1 block south of Liberty Road. What also makes this bit of information so compelling in my research is that after my mom’s mother died in July of 1930, she and her siblings were raised in grandmother Carrie’s home. My mom said she grew up off of Librerty Road and I have a feeling this just may be that home . . . woo-hoo!

Finally, I see my grandfather, Joseph (mom’s dad), listed in the city directory for the first time! He is about 17 years old now and works as a milker for Houston Cooperative Dairy Association. I can say with certainty that he didn’t work as a milker very long before he began his career with Southern Pacific Railroad and worked in the railroad industry until he retired in 1958.

This 1920 directory also reveals another new Chappel ancestor — Ella Chappel who works as a laundress and boards with Henry Chappel at 717 W 22nd Ave, in Houston Heights. Okay, are you thinking what I’m thinking? I’m sure you’re thinking what I’m thinking! This Ella, who has the same occupation and lives at the same address as Arie Chappel in the 1918 directory, must be Henry Chappel’s second new wife (see below)!

Houston City Directory, 1920

Lewis Chappel in Houston City Directory 1920

[Abstraction]

Chappel  Carrie  (c)  lndrs  r  w s August  1  s  of  Liberty rd
Chappel  Ella  (c) lndrs  h  717  W  22d  av
Chappel  Henry  hlpr  S.  P.  Shops  r  717  W  22d  av
Chappel  Joseph  (c)  milker  Ho  Co-Op  Dairy Assn  h  Carrie Chappel
Chappell  Amanda  (c)  lndrs  r  828  W  21st  av


WOW! When I started my search for Lewis Chapel a couple of months ago (April 15th to be exact), I knew absolutely nothing about him. But after using census records, the birth and death certificate of his son Lewis Blanton Chapple, and now Houston City Directories, I know more about him and other Chappel family members (Amanda Chappel, Henry Chappel, Arie Chappel, and Ella Chappel) than I ever imagined I would so soon.

Among the new names that I discovered, I noticed that Amanda Chappel’s address — W. 21st Avenue — seemed to be constant (with only a slight change in her house number) year after year in the directories. Are you thinking what I’m thinking? I’m sure you’re thinking what I’m thinking! There is a good chance that this may be Lewis’s mother and she owns this home that she has been living in since the early 1900’s! Okay, I’ve made a note to self (when I’m ready) to research deed records to see if my hunch about Amanda as a home owner is true.

So based on information from the 1900-1920 Houston City Directory, what new information have I been able to add to Great-Grandfather Lewis’ profile as I continue my search for him?

o Names (given, middle, and nicknames)
Lewis Chappel, or possibly Louis Chappel (1910 Census)

o Occupations
Live-in Servant for a Mrs. T. J. Goree (Houston City Directory, 1907)
Laborer (Houston City Directory, 1908-10 & 1912)
Pipefitter for a Gas Company (1910 Census)
Gass Plummer (son’s 1910 birth certificate),
Laborer for Houston Gas Company (Houston City Directory, 1911)
Laborer for S. P. Railroad Shops (Houston City Directory, 1913)
Laborer in Cotton-Compress Industry (1920 Census)

o Birth date and place
abt 1883, Texas, USA (1910 Census)
abt 1884, Texas, USA (1920 Census)

o Age
27 yrs old (1910 Census)
36 yrs old (1920 Census)

o Residence
1410 Capitol Ave, Houston, Texas (Houston City Directory, 1907)
W.  21st ave.  1   blk   w of Nashua.   Houston Heights (Houston City Directory, 1908)
614 McGowen Avenue (Houston City Directory, 1910)
1607 Saulnier Streeet, Houston, Texas 77019 (1910 Census)
815 Schwartz Street, Houston, TX (son’s birth & death certificate, 1910)
1  N.  E.  Crawford Street, Houston, Texas (Houston City Directory, 1911)
3 N. E. Crawford Street, Houston, Texas (Houston City Directory, 1912
721 Hill Street, Houston, Texas (Houston City Directory, 1913)
2426 Avenue J, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas (1920 Census)

o Family structure
Parents:
Siblings: Henry Chappel (Houston City Directory, 1915)
Spouse: Carrie Blanton abt 1903 (1910 Census)
Children: Joseph Chappel (1910 Census); Lewis Blanton Chappel (1910-1910)
Extended Family Members: SIL-Arie Chappel (Houston City Directory, 1918), SIL- Ella Chappel (Houston City Directory, 1920)

o Marriage
Married Carrie Blanton abt 1903 (1910 Census); separated from Carrie (Houston City Directory, 1913), (1920 Census)

Think we have a family connection?
Let me hear from you because  . . . I’m Claiming Kin!

Related Posts:
Mystery Monday: Searching for Lewis Chappel (Part 1)
Mystery Monday: Enumerated Twice in the 1910 Census?
Blue Monday: A Devastating Loss for Lewis and Carrie Chappel in 1910
Mystery Monday: Searching for Lewis Chappel (Part 2)


Source Citation:

1. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

2. Houston Heights. (2013, July 16). Wikipedia. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_Heights

3. Independence Heights, Houston. (2013, July 20). Wikipedia. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Heights,_Houston

 

Mystery Monday: Searching for Lewis Chappel (Part 2)

Taking a Closer LookEven though I did not find my great-grandparents enumerated as a family the first time I looked for them in the 1920 Census, I just could not dismiss this gut feeling I had that I really needed to visit that record AGAIN! When I think about everything they experienced in 1910 — the loss of a child and moving two or three different times — another look for them in the 1920 census just seemed so necessary. Well, I’m glad I did! I found them, not as I expected to find them, but . . . I found them!

In the city of Houston I found my great-grandmother Carrie and my grandfather Joseph together . . .

Carrie and Joseph Chappell in the 1920 US Census

Carrie and Joseph Chappell, 1920 US Census

[Abstraction]

Enumerated on the 20th day of February 1920, this  U. S. Federal Census reports living in the Pinehurst Addition of Houston, Harris County, Texas dwelling #454 was: [1]

Line 22:  Carrie Chappel, head of household, owner of the mortgaged home she lived in, age 35, a widow, born in Texas as were her parents, works as a Laundress for a Private Family

Line 23: Joseph Chappel, son, age 17, single, born in Texas as were his parents, works as a Laborer for a Railroad Company

In another Texas city, I found my great-grandfather  Lewis . . .

Lewis Chappell in 1920 Census

Lewis Chappel, 1920 US Census

[Abstraction]

Enumerated on the 3rd day of January 1920, this  U. S. Federal Census reports living as a boarder at 2426 Avenue J, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas was: [2]

Line 38:  Lewis Chappel, black male age 36, married, born in Texas as were his parents, works as a Laborer in the Compress Industry

Reviewing Ancestor Data

Review Data for Clues and New Information

WOW . . . this is interesting stuff!

As I take a closer look at both of these 1920 census records, I cannot help but think there may be “trouble” in the marriage of my great-grandparents!

  • Widow?!
    My great-grandmother obviously told the enumerator that she was a widow! But that wasn’t true at all because my great-grandfather was very much alive and well living just 50 miles away (by car) in the city of Galveston, Texas. Not to mention that I have not been able to find, to date, any record of my great-grandfather’s death in Texas between 1910 – 1920!
  • Married boarder?!
    My great-grandfather either told the enumerator he was married, or the owner of the boarding house where he lived did. Either way, my great-grandmother and grandfather are not living there with him and it seems my great-grandmother may see this separation as a, “death,” where my great-grandfather is concerned – YIKES!
  • Something else I’ve noticed is that my great-grandfather has gone from working as a Pipe-fitter/Gas Plummer for a Gas Company in Houston in 1910, to a Laborer in the Cotton-Compress Industry in Galveston, Texas by 1920! According to The Handbook of Texas Online, [3]

The cotton-compress industry developed in antebellum Texas because of the need to lower the cost of transporting cotton on sailing vessels. . . Compressors, which reduced bales received from cotton gins to roughly half their former size, were first acquired in port. By 1860 more than $500,000 had been invested in the industry at Galveston. As cotton culture spread into the Texas hinterland after the Civil War, compresses were built in many Texas towns in addition to the port cities. The development of communications and the extension of railroads into the state’s cotton-producing regions revolutionized the Texas cotton trade.”

With “widow” and “married boarder” being the key words that jumped out at me in these two records, I’m starting to think that my great-grandparents may have separated by this time! When did this separation take place and is it permanent? I’m not sure. But what I do know is that I will need more evidence than what was reported in this record to validate a legal separation, or divorce between them.

So what’s my next resource?

I think it’s time I use city directories to track them more closely between the 1900, 1910, and 1920 census decades! Hopefully this resource will help me pinpoint the year they arrived in Houston and when my great-grandfather left for Galveston. I also hope this directory will shine a HUGE spotlight on other Chappels living in Houston at this time who just may be immediate family members of my great-grandfather!

Based on information from this 1920 census record, what new information have I added to Great-Grandfather Lewis’ profile as I continue my search for him?

o Names (given, middle, and nicknames) – Lewis Chappel, or possibly Louis Chappel (1910 Census)
o Occupations – Pipefitter for a Gas Company (1910 Census); Gass Plummer (son’s 1910 birth certificate); Laborer in Cotton-Compress Industry (1920 Census)
o Birth date and place – abt 1883, Texas, USA (1910 Census), abt 1884, Texas, USA (1920 Census)
o Age – 27 yrs old (1910 Census); 36 yrs old (1920 Census)
o Residence – 1607 Saulnier Streeet, Houston, Texas 77019 (1910 Census); 815 Schwartz Street, Houston, TX (son’s birth & death certificate); 2426 Avenue J, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas
o Family structure – married to Carrie Blanton and has 2 sons, Joseph Chappel (1910 Census); Lewis Blanton Chappel (1910-1910); separated from Carrie & Joseph (1920 Census)
o Marriage – Married Carrie Blanton abt 1903 (1910 Census)

Think we have a family connection?
Let me hear from you because  . . . I’m Claiming Kin!

Related Posts:
Mystery Monday: Searching for Lewis Chappel (Part 1)
Mystery Monday: Enumerated Twice in the 1910 Census?
Blue Monday: A Devastating Loss for Lewis and Carrie Chappel in 1910

—–

Source Citation:

1. “United States Census, 1920,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCM8-GRQ : accessed 21 May 2013), Carrie Chappell, 1920.

2. “United States Census, 1920,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MHTY-KPB : accessed 21 May 2013), Lewis Chapel in entry for George Parish, 1920.

3. L. Tuffly Ellis, “COTTON-COMPRESS INDUSTRY,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/drc02), accessed June 09, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery at FindAGrave.com

This Memorial Day I honor my maternal and paternal ancestors (veterans and non-veterans) virtually with the launch of the – Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery– at FindAGrave.com! [1]

Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery

I actually established this “on-going” virtual cemetery New Year’s Day of this year, but did not want to release it online until –

1) I had 20 or more ancestors listed
2) I had a chance to verify each ancestors’ connection to me and my family

The purpose of this new virtual cemetery is to link the interments of all my maternal and paternal ancestors together despite the geographical location of their graves. Those of you who have been following me for a while know FindAGrave.com  is one of my favorite online resources to use with my family research. I started creating virtual cemeteries last year with the launch of my “on-going” Chapple Family Virtual Cemetery and when I see the number of visits that post has received via my blog’s Google Analytics dashboard widget and Feedjit live traffic feed, I hope that this post about this new virtual cemetery will do just as well too!

According to the Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs, on May 5, 1865, Decoration Day was established for our nation to decorate the graves of veterans with flowers. The first observance of this federal holiday took place at the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. But by the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 across the United States. By 1971, the US Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday and it was at that time that it would be observed on the last Monday in May.

With so many Americans honoring the deaths of love ones who were not veterans on Memorial Day, in December 2000 Congress passed and the president signed in to law — “The National Moment of Remembrance Act” — so that veterans are particularly not forgotten on this national day!  [2]

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation.”

To my family and friends, have a wonderful Memorial Day and if time allows, visit a local cemetery today! If you cannot make it to an actual cemetery, then I invite you to take a virtual stroll through the Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery by clicking the link or the graphic above; feel free to leave virtual flowers if you like!

—–

Source Citation:

1.   Taylor-Harris, L. (2013, May 25). Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery. Find A Grave – Millions of Cemetery Records and Online Memorials. Retrieved May 25, 2013, from http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=vcsr

2.   U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs. (2012, November 30). Memorial Day History. Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs. Retrieved May 25, 2013, from http://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday/history.asp

Blue Monday: A Devastating Loss for Lewis and Carrie Chappel in 1910

I now know that my great-grandmother, Carrie, was 3 months pregnant when her family was counted on April 18th for the 1910 census. How I know this? According to the 1903-1997 Texas Birth Index, on 19 October 1910, my great uncle, Lewis Blanton Chappel, was born! [1]

Lewis Blanton Chappel Birth

[Abstraction]

Certificate of Birth
City – Houston
County –  Harris
Certificate No. 36495

Date of Birth – Oct. 19th 1910
Name of Child – Lewis Blanton Chappel
Sex – Male
Race or Color – Colored
Legitimate or Otherwise – Legitimate
Alive or Stillborn – Alive
Name of Father – Lewis Chappel
Nationality – American
Maiden Name of Mother – Carrie Blanton
Nationality – American
Residence of Parents
Town – Houston
Street No. – 815 Swartz(?) Street
Occupation of Father – Gass Plummer
Name and Residence of Person Reporting – I. P. Lamb MD, 2009 Calhoun Ave.  Houston, Texas
Permanent Record. Write plainly with unfading ink. Place 1-cent stamp on reverse side and mail within 5 days to City Registrar if birth occurs in incorporated town; otherwise to County Clerk.

But not long after his arrival into this world, tragedy struck, and his death became a devastating loss for my great-grandparents, 9 December 1910! [2]

Lewis Blanton Chappel Death Certificate

[Abstraction]

Texas State Board of Health
STANDARD CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
Registered No. 1640

PLACE OF DEATH

County – Harris
City – Houston
No. 815 Schwartz St., 5 Ward

Full Name – Lewis Blanton Chappel

PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS

Sex – Male
Color or Race – Colored
Single, Married, Widowed or Divorced – Single Colored
Date of Birth – Oct 19, 1910
Age – 1 mo. 19 ds
Birthplace – Harris, Tex

PARENTS
Name of Father – Lewis Chappel
Birthplace of Father – Texas
Maiden Name of Mother – Carrie Blanton
Birthplace of Mother – Texas

THE ABOVE IS TRUE TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE
Informant – C Chappel
Address – 815 Schwartz

MEDICAL PARTICULARS

Date of Death – Dec 9 1910
I HEREBY CERTIFY, that I attended deceased from Dec 8 1910 to Dec 9 1910 that I saw him alive on Dec 8 1910 and that death occurred on the date named above  at 7 a.m.
The CAUSE OF DEATH was as follows: Congestion of Lungs
CONTRIBUTORY – Indigestion
I. P. Lamb, MD
Dec 9 1910
Address – 2009 Calhoun Ave.  Houston

PLACE OF BURIAL OR REMOVAL – Evergreen
DATE OF BURIAL – 12-10-1910
UNDERTAKER – I. S. Lewis
ADDRESS – 2615 1/2 Odin Ave

In addition to using Ancestry.com for locating historical documents about my ancestors, I also use FamilySearch.org where I’ve been fortunate enough to access and download for free birth and death records online for many of my ancestors. You’re probably wondering how in the world have I been able to access these documents online for free since state privacy laws prohibit access to vital records like these. Well being aware of what is considered public information and not public information in Texas helps a lot! According to Section 552.115: Confidentiality of Birth and Death Records from the 2012 Public Information Handbook,  [3]

“(a) A birth or death record maintained by the bureau of vital statistics of the Texas Department of Health or a local registration official is excepted from [required public disclosure], except that:

(1) a birth record is public information and available to the public on and after the 75th anniversary of the date of birth as shown on the record filed with the bureau of vital statistics or local registration official;

(2) a death record is public information and available to the public on and after the 25th anniversary of the date of death as shown on the record filed with the bureau of vital statistics or local registration official;

(3) a general birth index or a general death index established or maintained by the bureau of vital statistics or a local registration official is public information and available to the public to the extent the index relates to a birth record or death record that is public information and available to the public under Subdivision (1) or (2);

Reviewing Vital Records

More Clues and Information

The best way to show a valid connection for every ancestor you’ve added to your family tree is with BMDs —  birth, marriage, and death records! For the most part, birth certificates connect children and their parents. Marriage certificates connect husbands and wives. Death certificates can connect both –parents and spouses — provided the Informant giving the information at the time of death knows the decedent’s family history well enough to give accurate information.

I don’t have to tell you how SURPRISED I was to locate this birth and death record! I actually found baby Lewis’ death certificate when I wasn’t even looking for it. Once I had a birth date, his birth certificate came to light quickly.

According to the FamilySearch wiki — Introduction to Birth Records [4]

 . . . experts recommend looking into death records first and marriage records second. Followed by Birth records, because they are usually the most difficult to find. It is very common to find birth information in other soucres.”

My mom, who is my oldest living Chapple family member that I interview and discuss my findings with regularly, was just as surprised — shocked in fact — to learn that her father, who was raised as an only child, wasn’t the only child her grandmother had given birth to. Grandfather Joseph, would have been about 7 years old when his baby brother died. So I wonder why he never mentioned to mom (or any of his children) he had a baby brother who died as an infant? Or was this loss simply too difficult to “ever” talk about with others?

Baby Lewis’ birth and death records provide a few more interesting facts about the lives of my great-grandparents in 1910! When I first started tracking them in the 1910 Census:
1) Lewis, Carrie, and their son, Joseph were living in Houston’s Historic Freedmen’s Town at 1609 Saulnier Street, Houston, Texas in mid April.
2) Carrie, for whatever reason, is reported living in the home of her younger sister in Houston’s Historic Freedmen’s Town at 1604 Cleveland Street, Houston, Texas without her husband and son by late April.

Now by 9 December 1910:
3) Carrie, who is the informant on her son’s death certificate, reports they’re living in Houston’s Greater Fifth Ward Community at 815 Schwartz Street, Houston, Texas.
Like Freedmen’s Town, Fifth Ward was settled by freedmen too in 1866 and became known as a musically rich neighborhood just east of downtown Houston.

So based on information from these vital records, what new information have I added to my Great-Grandfather Lewis’ profile as I continue my search for him?

o Names (given, middle, and nicknames) – Lewis Chappel, or possibly Louis Chappel (1910 Census)
o Occupations – Pipefitter for a Gas Company (1910 Census); Gass Plummer (son’s birth certificate)
o Birth date and place – abt 1883, Texas, USA (1910 Census)
o Age – 27 yrs old (1910 Census)
o Residence – 1607 Saulnier Streeet, Houston, Texas 77019 (1910 Census); 815 Schwartz Street, Houston, TX (son’s birth & death certificate)
o Family structure – married to Carrie Blanton and has 2 sons, Joseph Chappel (1910 Census); Lewis Blanton Chappel (1910-1910)
o Marriage – Married Carrie Blanton abt 1903 (1910 Census)

Think we have a family connection?
Let me hear from you because  . . . I’m Claiming Kin!

Related Posts:
Mystery Monday: Searching for Lewis Chappel (Part 1)
Mystery Monday: Enumerated Twice in the 1910 Census?

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Source Citation:

1.  “Texas, Birth Certificates, 1903-1935,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VXM3-RLS : accessed 09 Apr 2013), Lewis Blanton Chappel, 1910.

2. “Texas, Deaths, 1890-1976,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JF3Y-CJW : accessed 09 Apr 2013), Lewis Blanton Chappel, 1910.

3. United States, Attorney General of Texas, Greg Abbott. (2011, November). 2012 Public Information Handbook. Retrieved April 09, 2013, from https://www.oag.state.tx.us/ag_publications/pdfs/publicinfo_hb.pdf

4. FamilySearch. (2012, November 27). United States Birth Records. FamilySearch. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/United_States_Birth_Records