Category Archives: Green

Workday Wednesday: Jesse Earl Green, another Maxwell House Man in My Family Tree

My paternal grandfather, Willie Taylor, wasn’t the only popular Maxwell House Man in my family tree. My great uncle Jesse Earl Green from Chappel Hill, Texas, with only a third grade education, went on to become the “first” African American Assistant Department Head of the Roast and Blend Division at Maxwell House!

Jesse Earl Green

Jesse Earl Green, Asst. Department Head of the Roast and Blend Division of General Foods Maxwell House Coffee in Houston, Texas

Uncle Jesse, the youngest of seven children was born December 29, 1911 to Lula Routt and Jim Green in Chappel Hill, Texas. He was just 18 years old when he left Chappel Hill in 1929 and came to Houston seeking employment and a better life. He worked odd jobs consistently until he was hired at Maxwell House as extra help in 1930. Once at Maxwell House, uncle Jesse was on the move! He quickly moved up the ranks as porter, coffee blender, sub roaster, regulator roaster and finally as special roaster where his special blend was a mixture of Brazilian and Colombian beans. His final promotion made Maxwell House history — he became the first African American Assistant Department Head of the Roast and Blend Division! He held this position until he retired in 1977.

C. W. Cook's visit to the Maxwell House Houston Plant, 1972

Photo was taken at the Maxwell House Houston Plant, May 19, 1972

According to the inscription on the back of the photo above, everyone featured represents 244 years of service to Maxwell House. Standing (left to right) is Jesse Earl Green (42 yrs), Lillian Riddle (43 yrs), C.W. “Tex” Cook (30 yrs), Willie Taylor (42 yrs), Frank Lenich (32 yrs), and George Curtis (35 yrs).

Green House Coffee

“Green House Coffee”

My uncle worked for Maxwell House for forty-seven years! Can you imagine working for any company forty-seven years? People just don’t work jobs for long periods of time anymore. Heck, companies don’t maintain internal departments long enough for anyone to work that long anymore! Well, forty-seven years is a very long time and his colleagues often said they were blessed to have had someone of his character for forty-seven years of service. At uncle’s retirement gala, his gift from Maxwell House was a batch of coffee of his own special blend — Brazilian and Colombian beans — put into cans labeled “Green House Coffee” with a picture of him on the label wearing his trademark — red bow tie!

While working at Maxwell House, Uncle Jesse went on to earn his Doctorate in Theology from Southwestern Theological Seminary. This advanced degree enhanced his service and leadership as Senior Pastor of Blessed Hope Missionary Baptist Church, a church he organized in May of 1950 in Houston, Texas.

Uncle Jesse Earl Green passed away on March 21, 1998 and was laid to rest in the Golden Gate Cemetery, 8400 Hirsch Road, Houston, Texas  77016

If you have my great uncle Jesse Earl Green, a real Maxwell House legend in your family tree, let me hear from you because . . .
I’m claiming kin!

Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery at FindAGrave.com

This Memorial Day I honor my maternal and paternal ancestors (veterans and non-veterans) virtually with the launch of the – Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery– at FindAGrave.com! [1]

Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery

I actually established this “on-going” virtual cemetery New Year’s Day of this year, but did not want to release it online until –

1) I had 20 or more ancestors listed
2) I had a chance to verify each ancestors’ connection to me and my family

The purpose of this new virtual cemetery is to link the interments of all my maternal and paternal ancestors together despite the geographical location of their graves. Those of you who have been following me for a while know FindAGrave.com  is one of my favorite online resources to use with my family research. I started creating virtual cemeteries last year with the launch of my “on-going” Chapple Family Virtual Cemetery and when I see the number of visits that post has received via my blog’s Google Analytics dashboard widget and Feedjit live traffic feed, I hope that this post about this new virtual cemetery will do just as well too!

According to the Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs, on May 5, 1865, Decoration Day was established for our nation to decorate the graves of veterans with flowers. The first observance of this federal holiday took place at the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. But by the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 across the United States. By 1971, the US Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday and it was at that time that it would be observed on the last Monday in May.

With so many Americans honoring the deaths of love ones who were not veterans on Memorial Day, in December 2000 Congress passed and the president signed in to law — “The National Moment of Remembrance Act” — so that veterans are particularly not forgotten on this national day!  [2]

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation.”

To my family and friends, have a wonderful Memorial Day and if time allows, visit a local cemetery today! If you cannot make it to an actual cemetery, then I invite you to take a virtual stroll through the Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery by clicking the link or the graphic above; feel free to leave virtual flowers if you like!

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Source Citation:

1.   Taylor-Harris, L. (2013, May 25). Claiming Kin Virtual Cemetery. Find A Grave – Millions of Cemetery Records and Online Memorials. Retrieved May 25, 2013, from http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=vcsr

2.   U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs. (2012, November 30). Memorial Day History. Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs. Retrieved May 25, 2013, from http://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday/history.asp

It’s National Voters Registration Day 2012!

According to theGriot.com today, September 25, 2012, over 1100 organizations across this country will come together nationally to inform people about voting opportunities and get them registered to vote in time for the 2012 General Election!

This day reminds me of my 83 year old paternal great-grandmother, Birdie Elizabeth (Green) Aldridge, who I blogged about last year, being the talk of the town as her photo and comments about the 1971 election in Parsons, Labette County, Kansas were captured in their local newspaper. Momma Birdie (the name everyone called her) had not missed voting in an election (local or national) since she moved to Kansas from Texas in 1912. The reason for that she says is, “Voting is second only to worshiping God (to learn more about Momma Birdie, read —My Fearless Female Ancestor Who Made the News)!”

So why is this National Voters Registration Day 2012 so important?

It is no secret that voter suppression is still alive and well in this country, and poses a real threat to millions in this year’s presidential election. It has been reported that 17-21 states (mine included), have put in place strict photo ID laws which will literally prevent many young people and the elderly from being able to vote in this year’s election. States claim they put in place stricter photo ID laws to prevent voter fraud which they alleged happened in various counties during the 2008 election. Yet, when it comes to states proving voter fraud actually took place, there has been no real hard evidence to back up their claims.

I believe the real reason for the stricter photo ID laws today is to prevent record numbers of minority voters from showing up at the polls as they did in 2008. According to the US Census Bureau,

“About 131 million people reported voting in the 2008 U.S. presidential election, an increase of 5 million from 2004, according to a new table package released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. The increase included about 2 million more black voters, 2 million more Hispanic voters and about 600,000 more Asian voters, while the number of non-Hispanic white voters remained statistically unchanged.”

Just as my great-grandmother believed voting was next to worshiping God in importance, I believe this National Voters Registration Day is just as important as the November 6, 2012 general  election itself. And if my 83 year old great-grandmother made it to the polls in her physical condition (amputee due to crippling diabetes), then I know anyone with reasonably good health can find their way to the polls to vote in this year’s election!

For more information about voting in the United States, visit – USA.gov
For more information about voting in Texas visit — VoteTexas.org, an official government website created by the Office of the Texas Secretary of State to provide information to citizens a one-stop website regarding voting in Texas.

Please keep in mind that voter registration deadlines and early voting vary from state to state. So Texans, here are dates important to you:

Voter Registration Deadline  – October 9, 2012

Early Voting in Texas – October 22, 2012 – November 2, 2012

General 2012 Election – November 6, 2012

ATTENTION TEXANS:
Please, please, please, DO NOT wait until election day to find out if you’re registered to vote or not; to know who you’re voting for (trust me you are going to want to vote on other issues that appear on the ballot that will impact your life); to know where to go for early voting and/or voting in the general election. Learn the answers to ALL these frequently asked questions early by visiting VoteTexas.org today!

Surname Saturday: Routt, 2nd Generation – The Children

The 2nd Generation of Routt ancestors in my Texas Family Tree are the children of Osborn and Sallie Routt:

Ninth Census, United States, 1870

View the Census!

Buchanon Routt, born 1860 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA; he died ????

Jefferson “Jeff”  Routt,   born 1863 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas USA; he died 27 April 1935, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas,  USA. He married Daisy Newsome, 27 January 1917, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas,  USA

Mary Francis Routt, born 1865 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA; she died ????

Lou “Lula” Routt, born 12 September 1867 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA; she died 14 March 1964, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA. She married James “Jim” Green, 27 September 1888, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA

Charlotte “Lottie” Routt, born 1872 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA. She married Washington “Wash” Nelson, Jr., 04 March 1893 in Brenham, Washington, Texas, USA

William “Willie” Routt, born 1874 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA; he died 21 November 1933 in Prairie View, Waller, Texas, USA. He married Rosa “Rosie” Baltimore, 15 September 1901, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA

View the Census!

John “Johnnie” Routt, born 1874 in Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA; he died 30 June 1931, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA. He married Isabelle Whitfield, 22 December 1897, Chappell Hill, Washington, Texas, USA

Buchanon and Mary Francis Routt, listed above, are my “brick wall” Routt ancestors for the moment. I have researched many of the online databases, family trees, and newspapers for them, but I haven’t had any luck finding them beyond the late 1870 and 1880 census. So my next step is to schedule a road trip in the coming months to Washington County to search the holdings where they lived. So stay tuned, there’s more to come!

In the meantime, if you have some of my 2nd Generation Routt ancestors in your family tree, let me hear from you because I’m — Claiming Kin!

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Source Citation

1. Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 2, Washington, Texas; Roll: M593_1608; Page: 14A; Image: 31; Family History Library Film: 553107.

2. Year: 1880; Census Place: , Washington, Texas; Roll: 1331; Family History Film: 1255331; Page: 74A; Enumeration District: 142; .

Sunday’s Obituary: Lula Green (1867-1964)

Obituary

I was just 5 years old when I met my great-great grandmother Lula for the very first time, and it wasn’t long after that meeting that she passed away. So, I’m sorry to say that I simply have no memory of her. But what I do remember is hearing family members speak fondly of her through the years since her death.

Click to read and view!

[Transcription]

LaVIDA: The Black Voice in Ft. Worth, TX
Saturday, May 2, 1964

Services Held for Mrs. Lula Green

Funeral services for Mrs. Lula Green, the mother of Rev. J. H. Green, Pastor of Mayfield Baptist Church, were conducted Wednesday, March 18, from Ebenezer Baptist Church, Chapel Hill, Texas. She was 97 years old.

Mrs. Green was the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Osborne Routt and was born in Chapel Hill, Texas, where she received her early schooling. She united with this church at an early age. She met and married Mr. Jim Green on September 27, 1888. To this union, thirteen children were born. He preceded her in death.

She was a faithful churchman – and a devoted wife and mother. She believed in not sending her children but going with them to church. The example she lived day by day will ever be a goal for her family to strive to reach.

She was faithful to her church always present at every service unless providentially hindered from being there, and say to it that the family group attended with her.

She is survived by seven children namely: Miss Birdie Aldridge, Kansas; Nelson and Jim Green, Jr., Chapel Hill; Rev. John H. Green, Fort Worth; Sterling Green, California; Mrs. Sallie Lewis, Houston; and Rev. Jesse Green, also of Houston, TX. Also seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, four great-great-grandchildren, and other relatives and friends.